Movement, play and brain development

We explored, in previous posts (for example, here and here) , the importance of motor activity, and particularly play for brain development, and the importance of movement and play in improving learning. A lovely short article, from our sister school in Philadelphia, described the incorporation in that school of the “moveable classroom” (sic). Well worth…

No Homework?!

At the Waldorf School of Baltimore, students are assigned homework beginning only in the middle of third grade. Even then, the work is designed so that it usually requires only minutes to complete. As our students progress through the grades, the workload gradually increases. This reflects one of the important tenants of Waldorf Education – that…

Fun & Games

Fun and Games was the topic of the final two days of our Faculty Work Week. Playworks, a national non-profit organization, supports our endeavors to incorporate healthy, inclusive play for every student into every school day. Our trainer, Sean, enthusiastically shared some of his techniques for building rapport, using signals and attention getters, implementing transitions,…

The case for free play: TimberNook

An important pillar of Waldorf Education is the emphasis on active play. Starting at parent-child classes, and continuing through the school years, students are encouraged to spend time outdoors—in all weather conditions—to explore and to challenge their mind and bodies. Recess period is no less important than classroom periods. The benefits of free play and…

Play is the central item in children’s lives.

The Lemelson Center at the Smithsonian Institute is devoted to the study of invention and innovation. It produced a short video exploring the role of play in children’s development. Most of the video consists of comments by scientists and educators; worth viewing. Several additional videos on the Lemelson Center site further explore this topic. One…