How learning a second language improves brain development

One of the appealing aspects of the Waldorf Education curriculum is the emphasis on teaching a foreign language at elementary school, and continuing through all the school years. At Waldorf School of Baltimore, Spanish is taught as a foreign language. Señora Pasion, our Spanish teacher, begins working with our rising first grade students towards the…

How to teach math

Early this month the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) will release the results of the 2015 round of testing of 15-year-olds from 72 countries on their science, reading and mathematics skills. The test is administered every 3 years by PISA. In previous years, students in the USA have scored poorly on some of these…

Curiosity is addictive

I teach medical and graduate students, and I am often struck by the relative lack of curiosity in some of these intelligent young people, all of whom have had highly regarded college and high school careers. (Don’t get me wrong, many of them are fabulously curios!) One reason I am enthusiastic about Waldorf Education is…

Movement, play and brain development

We explored, in previous posts (for example, here and here) , the importance of motor activity, and particularly play for brain development, and the importance of movement and play in improving learning. A lovely short article, from our sister school in Philadelphia, described the incorporation in that school of the “moveable classroom” (sic). Well worth…

Introduction to Waldorf Education: Animated

A short animation describing some of the core principles of Waldorf Education . Useful for those relative and friends that need a brief introduction. Alternatively, you could consult The Simpsons version…

Continue following us on WhyWaldorfEducationWorks.org

You can now read this blog on WhyWaldorfEducationWorks.org.. Our previous address, WSBAdultEducation.org will be retired soon. For uninterrupted service, we recommend that you subscribe to email notifications; see the options at the footer of our home page.

No Homework?!

At the Waldorf School of Baltimore, students are assigned homework beginning only in the middle of third grade. Even then, the work is designed so that it usually requires only minutes to complete. As our students progress through the grades, the workload gradually increases. This reflects one of the important tenants of Waldorf Education – that…

Fun & Games

Fun and Games was the topic of the final two days of our Faculty Work Week. Playworks, a national non-profit organization, supports our endeavors to incorporate healthy, inclusive play for every student into every school day. Our trainer, Sean, enthusiastically shared some of his techniques for building rapport, using signals and attention getters, implementing transitions,…

Musical Training enhances language skills

We have written previously (here, here and here) about the benefits of music education, and pointed out the rich music education program at the Waldorf School of Baltimore. As in other blog posts here, when discussing potential benefits of Waldorf Education we have strived to limit our description to studies that are well controlled, scientifically…

Minecraft and Waldorf Education?!

Yes, we let our boys adventure with Minecraft, the award winning, addictive video game used by over 100 million people worldwide. Including many of our children’s classmates. And they savor the limited time they are allowed to explore this creative platform. In a recent article in the New York Times, Clive Thompson explores the history…

The benefits of a fountain pen

Josh Giesbrecht, a public school teacher and writer from Canada, in a recent article in The Atlantic, rekindled the discussion on the importance of handwriting (see our posts here, here and here). But, with a twist. Giesbrecht suggests that perhaps it is not digital technology that hinders handwriting and its important benefits to learning and…

Recreating the Sistine Chapel

I led a tour of my daughter’s 7th grade classroom at the Waldorf School of Baltimore yesterday and found the class laying under their desks, in the dark, in silence. Two of the students explained to the group that they were studying Michelangelo, and that he had to lay on his back on scaffolding, working…